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Q:

PHP mktime() function (with example)

Hello everyone,

I'm currently working on a PHP project and came across the mktime() function. I have some understanding of how it works, but I'd appreciate some clarification and perhaps some practical examples to better understand its usage.

From what I understand, the mktime() function in PHP is used to get the Unix timestamp for a specific date and time. It takes in six parameters: hour, minute, second, month, day, and year. However, I'm not entirely clear on how these parameters should be formatted or passed into the function.

Additionally, I would love to see some examples of how to use the mktime() function in different scenarios. For example, how can I use it to find the Unix timestamp for tomorrow at 3 PM? Or how about finding the timestamp for a specific date in the past, like September 15, 2010, at 10 AM?

Any help or insights on the mktime() function would be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance!

All Replies

kara.erdman

Hey everyone,

I stumbled upon this thread and wanted to add my own experience with using the mktime() function in PHP. It's a useful tool for manipulating and working with dates and times in Unix timestamp format.

When it comes to formatting the parameters for mktime(), there are a few things I learned along the way. The hour, minute, and second parameters can be integers, while the month and day parameters can be either integers or strings. It's worth noting that if the day or month exceeds the valid range, mktime() automatically adjusts the values. For instance, if you pass in 13 for the month, it will be interpreted as January of the following year.

For your first query about finding the Unix timestamp for tomorrow at 3 PM, here's an alternative approach:

php
$tomorrow_timestamp = strtotime('tomorrow + 3 hours');


This solution makes use of the strtotime() function, which is another valuable tool for handling dates and times in PHP. By providing the 'tomorrow' keyword and adding '3 hours' to it, you can obtain the Unix timestamp for tomorrow at 3 PM.

In a similar vein, if you want to get the timestamp for a specific date in the past, like September 15, 2010, at 10 AM, you can use the strtotime() function as well:

php
$past_date_timestamp = strtotime('September 15, 2010 10:00 AM');


By passing in the desired date and time format as a string, strtotime() will convert it into a Unix timestamp.

I hope my experience using mktime() and alternative approaches with strtotime() have provided you with some additional insights. Feel free to ask if you have any further questions!

sherman.ratke

Hey there!

I've been using the mktime() function in PHP for quite some time now, so I thought I'd share my own experiences with you. Understanding how to properly format the parameters took me some trial and error, so I hope my explanation can be of help to you.

To use the mktime() function, you'll need to follow a specific format for the parameters. The hour, minute, and second parameters should be integers, while the month and day parameters can be either integers or strings. For example, you can pass in 3 for the hour parameter to represent 3 AM, or you can pass in "3" as a string – both will work.

Regarding your question about finding the Unix timestamp for tomorrow at 3 PM, here's an example that might help:

php
$tomorrow_timestamp = mktime(15, 0, 0, date("m"), date("d")+1, date("Y"));


In this example, we set the hour to 15 (3 PM), while the minute and second are set to 0. Then, we use the date() function to get the current month, day, and year. By adding 1 to the day, we ensure that it represents tomorrow. Finally, we pass these values to the mktime() function to get the Unix timestamp for tomorrow at 3 PM.

For your second question about finding the timestamp for a specific date in the past, such as September 15, 2010, at 10 AM, you can use the following example:

php
$past_date_timestamp = mktime(10, 0, 0, 9, 15, 2010);


In this case, we simply provide the hour, minute, and second parameters, followed by the specific month, day, and year values. The mktime() function will then return the Unix timestamp for that particular date and time.

I hope my personal experience and examples have helped clarify how to use the mktime() function. If you have any further questions, feel free to ask!

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