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PHP fgetss() function (with example)

Hey fellow developers!

I've been working on a project recently and came across the `fgetss()` function in PHP. I have a basic understanding of how it works, but I'm still a bit confused about its usage and how it differs from other similar functions.

Could someone please explain to me what exactly the `fgetss()` function does and provide an example of how it can be used? I would really appreciate some personal context or scenarios where this function would come in handy.

Thanks in advance for your help!

All Replies

marisa42

Hey everyone,

I came across this thread and thought I'd share my own personal experience with the `fgetss()` function in PHP.

In one of my recent projects, I had a requirement to parse a CSV file that contained some HTML snippets. However, I wanted to extract only the plain text from those HTML snippets and discard any HTML tags or scripts to ensure data integrity.

`fgetss()` proved to be the perfect solution for this task. It reads a line from a file pointer and filters out any HTML tags, keeping only the plain text. This function saved me a lot of time and effort, as I didn't have to manually write regex patterns or use complex parsing libraries.

Here's a snippet from my implementation:

php
$file = fopen('data.csv', 'r');
if ($file) {
while (($line = fgetss($file)) !== false) {
// Process the plain text line
$data = processText($line);
// Do something with the sanitized data
// ...
}
fclose($file);
} else {
echo "Failed to open the file.";
}


With `fgetss()`, I could iterate through each line of the CSV file, and the function efficiently removed any HTML tags, leaving me with just the plain text. I then passed the sanitized line to a custom `processText()` function to further manipulate or analyze the data based on my project requirements.

Overall, `fgetss()` was a lifesaver for me in this situation, providing a simple and effective way to ensure the integrity and safety of the data I was working with.

If anyone has alternative approaches or additional tips related to the usage of `fgetss()`, I'd love to hear them!

Cheers!

ijohnson

Hey there!

Sure, I'd be happy to share my personal experience with the `fgetss()` function in PHP.

In a recent project, I had a requirement to read and sanitize input files that contained HTML code. The `fgetss()` function came to the rescue. It reads a line from a file pointer and removes all HTML and PHP tags from the line before returning it. This function is quite handy when you need to extract pure text from a file and want to remove any potential security vulnerabilities, like malicious code injections.

Here's a simple example of how I used `fgetss()` in my project:

php
$handle = fopen('input.html', 'r');
if ($handle) {
while (($line = fgetss($handle)) !== false) {
// Process the sanitized line further
echo $line . "<br>";
}
fclose($handle);
} else {
echo "Failed to open the file.";
}


In this code, I opened the `input.html` file and used a `while` loop with `fgetss()` to read one line at a time. The HTML and PHP tags were automatically removed from each line, ensuring that only plain text was processed. I then performed additional operations on the sanitized line as needed, in this case, simply printing it out with a line break.

Overall, `fgetss()` was extremely useful in my situation, giving me peace of mind that I was working with clean and safe data.

If anyone has more insights or alternative use cases for `fgetss()`, please feel free to share!

rodolfo94

Hey folks,

I stumbled upon this discussion and thought I'd chip in with my own personal experience using the `fgetss()` function in PHP.

In a recent project, I was working on a web scraping task where I needed to extract specific information from a webpage. The challenge was that the webpage's content contained a lot of unnecessary HTML tags and scripts, making it difficult to extract the desired data.

That's when I discovered the power of `fgetss()`. This nifty little function not only allows you to read a line from a file pointer, but it also automatically removes any HTML and PHP tags from the line before returning it. This made the data extraction process much simpler and more efficient for me.

Take a look at an excerpt from my implementation:

php
$handle = fopen('webpage.html', 'r');
if ($handle) {
while (($line = fgetss($handle)) !== false) {
// Process the sanitized line
$extractedData = processData($line);
// Store or manipulate the extracted data as needed
// ...
}
fclose($handle);
} else {
echo "Failed to open the file.";
}


Here, I opened the HTML file containing the webpage's content, and using a `while` loop with `fgetss()`, I iterated through each line. The function automatically stripped away all the HTML and PHP tags, leaving me with only the raw data I needed. I then passed the sanitized line to a custom `processData()` function for further extraction and manipulation.

Using `fgetss()` greatly simplified my web scraping task, and the extracted data was clean and ready for analysis. It saved me from having to write complex regular expressions or use external libraries just to filter out unwanted tags.

If anyone has alternative suggestions or additional experiences working with `fgetss()`, feel free to share them!

Happy coding!

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