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Q:

How can I configure PHP-FPM to work with different pools or virtual hosts?

I'm new to managing PHP-FPM and I'm struggling to configure it to work with different pools or virtual hosts. I have a website with multiple domains and each domain should have its own separate PHP-FPM pool. However, I'm not sure how to set this up correctly.

I've tried looking at the PHP-FPM documentation, but I'm finding it a bit overwhelming and confusing. I'm not sure what settings I need to change in the configuration file, and how to ensure that each virtual host or pool is using the correct PHP-FPM instance.

I'm using Nginx as my web server and I've already set up the virtual hosts for each domain. Now, I just need to configure PHP-FPM to work with each virtual host separately.

I would really appreciate any help or guidance on how to properly configure PHP-FPM for different pools or virtual hosts. Thank you in advance!

All Replies

ytillman

I had a similar issue when I first started working with PHP-FPM and multiple pools. It took me some time to figure it out, but I can share my experience with you.

To configure PHP-FPM with different pools or virtual hosts, you will need to make changes in the PHP-FPM configuration file. Firstly, locate the main PHP-FPM configuration file, usually named `php-fpm.conf` or `www.conf`, depending on your setup.

In this file, you can define separate pools for each virtual host. Look for the `pools` section or similar. You should see a pool configuration block that looks like this:


[www]
user = www-data
group = www-data
listen = /run/php/php7.4-fpm.sock
...


To create a new pool, you can duplicate this block and modify the settings accordingly:


[mydomain]
user = www-data
group = www-data
listen = /run/php/mydomain-fpm.sock
...


Make sure to give your new pool a unique name, like `mydomain`, and adjust the `listen` parameter to a different socket file or port number. This will ensure that each virtual host uses a separate PHP-FPM pool.

Once you have set up the pools, you need to configure your web server (Nginx) to use these pools for each virtual host. In your Nginx virtual host configuration file, find the `location ~ \.php$` block and update it to include the following line:

nginx
fastcgi_pass unix:/run/php/mydomain-fpm.sock;


Replace `mydomain` with the name of your pool. This will direct Nginx to send PHP requests to the correct pool for that virtual host.

After making these changes, save the files and restart both PHP-FPM and Nginx. You can do this by running commands like `sudo systemctl restart php7.4-fpm` and `sudo systemctl restart nginx`, depending on your system.

By configuring PHP-FPM in this way, each virtual host will have its own isolated PHP-FPM pool, allowing you to handle different domains separately.

ezra51

I encountered a similar challenge when trying to configure PHP-FPM for different virtual hosts with separate pools. After some trial and error, I found a solution that worked well for me.

To start, I edited the main PHP-FPM configuration file, usually located at `/etc/php/7.x/fpm/php-fpm.conf` or `/etc/php/7.x/fpm/pool.d/www.conf`. Inside this file, I added a new pool configuration block for each virtual host.

For example, I created a pool block named `[mydomain]` with its own set of directives:

conf
[mydomain]
user = mydomain-user
group = mydomain-group
listen = /var/run/php-fpm/mydomain.sock
...


I replaced `mydomain` with the actual name of the virtual host, and updated the user, group, and listen directives accordingly.

Next, I needed to configure Nginx to properly communicate with each PHP-FPM pool. In the Nginx virtual host configuration file, within the relevant server block, I added the following location block:

nginx
location ~ \.php$ {
fastcgi_pass unix:/var/run/php-fpm/mydomain.sock;
...
}


Here, I specified the correct socket path for the PHP-FPM pool corresponding to the virtual host. Make sure to adjust the file path to match the one you set in the PHP-FPM configuration file.

After completing these configurations, I restarted both PHP-FPM and Nginx to apply the changes. I used commands like `sudo systemctl restart php7.4-fpm` and `sudo systemctl restart nginx` depending on the system.

This setup allowed me to isolate PHP-FPM pools for each virtual host effectively. Each domain was now running independently with its own dedicated PHP-FPM pool, ensuring better control, resource management, and stability.

Though configuring PHP-FPM with separate pools for virtual hosts may initially seem challenging, it's definitely worthwhile. With some careful adjustments to the configuration files and server blocks, you'll have a robust environment to handle multiple domains smoothly.

camryn78

I had a similar issue when setting up PHP-FPM with multiple pools for different virtual hosts. It was quite a learning curve for me, but I managed to get it working with a slightly different approach.

Instead of modifying the main PHP-FPM configuration file, I created separate pool configuration files for each virtual host. To do this, I created a new directory called `pools` in the PHP-FPM configuration folder.

Inside the `pools` directory, I created a new configuration file for each virtual host, naming them something like `mydomain.conf`. In these files, I defined the pool settings specific to each virtual host, such as the user, group, and listen directive.

For example, in `mydomain.conf`, I had:


[mydomain]
user = www-data
group = www-data
listen = /run/php/mydomain.sock
...


I made sure to replace `mydomain` with the actual name of the virtual host. This way, each virtual host had its own dedicated PHP-FPM pool configuration.

Next, I needed to configure Nginx to use these separate pools. In the Nginx virtual host configuration file, within the `location ~ \.php$` block, I modified the `fastcgi_pass` directive to include the PHP-FPM pool configuration file:

nginx
fastcgi_pass unix:/etc/php-fpm.d/pools/mydomain.sock;


Again, I replaced `mydomain` with the correct virtual host name.

After saving the changes, I restarted both PHP-FPM and Nginx. This allowed Nginx to correctly communicate with the appropriate PHP-FPM pool for each virtual host, ensuring isolation and separation.

Using this method, I found it easier to manage separate pools for different virtual hosts, as each pool had its own dedicated configuration file. It provided better organization and flexibility when dealing with multiple domains on my server.

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